Coal mining has long been a key part of Australia’s coal economy, but there’s been a huge change in how the industry is managed over the last decade.

As well as mining the nation’s largest coal seam gas reserves, the industry also has its sights set on extracting coal from the southern coastal plains.

The industry is currently trying to build a new mine on the Goldfields, one that could create tens of thousands of jobs.

The new mine is to be the world’s largest open-pit coal mine, with plans to mine more than 6.5 billion tonnes of coal in a project that could take up to 25 years to complete.

It is the largest coal mine in the world.

The mine is expected to create at least 3,000 jobs, according to the Australian Mining Association (AMA), which is in charge of the mine.

Coal seam gas mining is the biggest export of Australia, accounting for almost 30 per cent of its coal exports.

The company behind the mine is the South Australian Coal Council (SACC), which has a history of taking risks to invest in new coal mines.

Its biggest success came with the construction of the first open-source coal mine near Townsville, South Australia in 2014.

But the SACC has since backed off of the project, and instead has been investing in new mines in the Murray-Darling Basin.

This year, the SASC will be investing in a coal seam mine in South Australia’s Northern Territory, while a joint venture between SACC and Anglo American is planning to mine an estimated 1.8 billion tonnes in the Great Northern coal region of New South Wales.

SACC chief executive Andrew Wright told the ABC that coal seam mines were vital to the SA’s economy.

He said that the SAFC was committed to supporting the development of the Murray Darling Basin in its role as the SACoal Association’s regional chairman.

The SACoin Association says the SA coal industry has been hit hard by a recent downturn in the market, as well as the global mining crisis, as a result of the global financial crisis.

The association has launched a $1 million fund to help pay for new mines.

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